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Work

You spend so much time at work ~ it shouldn’t make you miserable

Job change, job loss, re-entering the workforce, retirement? Redefine your self-concept

Self-presentation in the workplace

Notes to stay-at-home moms (and dads)

Deep breathing and relaxation techniques to de-stress from your stressful day

You spend so much time at work ~ it shouldn’t make you miserable

C is at the top of her profession. Her success has come from hard work, savvy interpersonal skills, and a very powerful brain. She is not someone who has hurt others on her way to the top. Unfortunately, C goes through many days and nights with a cloud of stress and frustration hanging over her. This cloud is created and maintained every day by her supervisor who, using questionable tactics, insinuated her way into the space directly above C in the chain of command. The past few years of the supervisor’s history reveal an indisputable pattern of creating situations in order to undermine C’s reputation and position. Since they’re all fabricated, she hasn’t succeeded. But, she has caused major stress and wasted time that could have been used much more productively and pleasantly. C has always loved her work, but is now considering early retirement as an escape from the daily persecution.

M has been at his job for twenty years—he knows the routine, knows all the players, and goes above and beyond his assigned responsibilities. But, M truly hates his job. He hates the work, hates the people he has to deal with, hates the long hours and stressful situations, and is miserable most of the time. M’s options are limited, however, because it is a family company created by his father, and M is expected to stay there forever.

Why are you at your current job? Are you there because you love it, and you made a conscious effort and choice to get that position? Or, are you there for some other reason, and maybe you would rather be somewhere else? Most jobs have difficult or unpleasant elements at least some of the time. If you like the substance of your work, you can draw on your overall enjoyment or satisfaction to find the motivation to cope with the negative elements. If you do not like what you do, maybe you can find other reasons to feel ok about your job—such as money, prestige, convenience, coworkers, etc. If you hate everything about your current work situation, think about these questions:

  1. Can you make it better? Is there anything you can do to improve the setting, procedures, relationships, or whatever elements of your job make you most unhappy? Can a supervisor or human resources employee help you? Can you change anything aboutyour approach to the job that will improve the overall situation?
  2. If you can’t change anything to make it better, is it practical for you to look for another job?
  3. If you can’t change anything, and it’s not practical for you to look for another job at the moment, your only option may be to find ways to reduce the impact of your work on your emotional well-being, and on other areas of your life (there is more information about this issue later in this section.)

You spend so much time at work ~ it shouldn’t make you miserable

Job change, job loss, re-entering the workforce, retirement? Redefine your self-concept

Self-presentation in the workplace

Notes to stay-at-home moms (and dads)

Deep breathing and relaxation techniques to de-stress from your stressful day



BluebirdPages.com was created to provide accurate and useful information about a variety of personal and interpersonal topics. You can also find stories here about people whose life experiences may be similar to yours. BluebirdPages.com is not psychotherapy. Its goal is to provide information and ideas that can help you find your own power over your own life, and move toward greater happiness, comfort and fulfillment.
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