Bluebird Pages
Information and ideas to help you feel better in your life, in your relationships, and in your own skin
Home Relationships Food/Weight/Body Image Stress/Anxiety Work Self-Esteem Trauma Self-Care
Sadness/Depression

You’re not alone

How bad is it? From mild sadness, to absolute despair ~ here’s what you need to do to take care of yourself

Thinking about your thoughts to help yourself feel better

Fake it ‘til you make it ~ how acting happier can move you in that direction

Deep breathing and relaxation to soothe your soul

You’re not alone

N is a superstar—she is at the top of her class in a competitive college, has good friends and an equally successful boyfriend, and is a leader in her activities. N also cries a few times each week and sometimes feels like she is wearing a “happy mask” in order to get through her days. Though she is still dealing with weekly sadness, it is a huge improvement over where she used to be emotionally. All through her childhood, N struggled with significant depression, including a few trips to the hospital after taking handfuls of pills. Difficult life events like family fighting, and friend drama triggered extreme despair, and she found herself making some bad choices about relationships in desperate but misguided attempts to find happiness and comfort. N spent years learning how to take care of herself and manage her sadness, with lots of bumps in the road, but, overall, with great progress. She is now working on allowing herself to feel proud and happy about her accomplishments and the positive people in her life.

V is in his early fifties, married to his high school sweetheart, with two adult sons. His wife has an illness that, at times, requires V to spend hours taking care of her, and to be solely responsible for all household income and tasks. V’s parents also require much of his time and attention. Unfortunately, they often reward his caretaking efforts with complaints and criticisms. V loves his family, and is mostly content with his work and social life, but he sometimes feels very emotionally drained and sad. Though it would be natural for V to ask for support from his loved ones when he’s feeling down, it is difficult for him, since they often don’t have enough of their own emotional resources to be able to focus on V’s needs.

E is having some trouble socially. She does not feel like she fits in with her colleagues at work, and finds it difficult to make friends in general. E has had some sadness on and off for awhile. Some days she feels ok, but some days it’s hard for her to make herself get out of bed. Because she feels down, she does not have the motivation to think about or act on ideas to improve her social situation. And, because her social situation doesn’t improve, E gets more and more sad and lonely. So, she is stuck in a cycle of emotions and behaviors that prevents her from feeling better. E could feel better if she worked on breaking this cycle and taking more control over her own life.

Do these stories sound familiar? Everyone feels sad sometimes, and it’s often a normal and healthy reaction to a situation. For example, many people feel sad after the death of a loved one or a breakup, or after receiving bad news. It’s often important to let yourself experience the sadness in order to move through the bad feelings, and move forward in your life. But, it’s important not to get stuck in your sadness when it stops being useful. As with all of the topics discussed in Bluebird Pages, the goal is to help you feel better within yourself, and in the many areas of your life. This section can help you ease your sadness, and reclaim happiness and contentment in your experiences.

You’re not alone

How bad is it? From mild sadness, to absolute despair ~ here’s what you need to do to take care of yourself

Thinking about your thoughts to help yourself feel better

Fake it ‘til you make it ~ how acting happier can move you in that direction

Deep breathing and relaxation to soothe your soul



BluebirdPages.com was created to provide accurate and useful information about a variety of personal and interpersonal topics. You can also find stories here about people whose life experiences may be similar to yours. BluebirdPages.com is not psychotherapy. Its goal is to provide information and ideas that can help you find your own power over your own life, and move toward greater happiness, comfort and fulfillment.
Home ęBluebirdPages.com Contact