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Food/Weight/Body Image

Would you like something to be different about your weight, your nutrition, or how you see your body?

Over-eating? Restricting? Bingeing? Track you food behavior and figure out what’s going on.

Delaying the decision ~ a trick to taking back your power over food

Retrain your brain to see yourself more positively and more accurately

How bad is it? From minor insecurities to significant eating disorders ~ here’s what you need to do
   to take care of yourself.

Would you like something to be different about your weight,
your nutrition, or how you see your body?

S has struggled with her weight and her body image since she was a child. She knows about nutrition and fitness, but has trouble being consistent with healthy practices. If everything in her life is going well, she is generally able to maintain balanced eating habits. But, if life becomes too stressful, she turns to food to soothe herself. This begins a cycle for S—she overeats as a response to stress; she then feels terrible about the overeating; she feels worse about her body and herself; and, she continues to overeat in impulsive and unsuccessful attempts to feel better.

L’s marriage has had ups and downs since they had children, and she has sometimes suspected her husband of cheating. He always denied it and they moved on with their lives, until last month, when he admitted to a several month affair with a colleague. They decided to stay together and he promises that he ended the affair. Besides the shattered trust, the betrayal also destroyed L’s already-poor body image. As they approach rebuilding their marriage, it is almost impossible for her to feel good enough about herself to be comfortable with any intimacy. By the way, L is one of those rare women who is truly so beautiful that people stop and stare when she walks by.

D is teeny tiny. She is a teenager who swims in size 00 clothes. For years she has seen herself as obese, though she often hovers around a weight so low that hospitalization is a possibility. D has anorexia nervosa, and is very “successful” at restricting her food intake to dangerously low levels. Thoughts about food—craving it and avoiding it—consume her mind and her time. She has little energy and attention left over for anything else in her life. No matter how much weight she loses, and regardless of the medical consequences, D always believes that she needs to be skinnier and skinnier.

J’s mother has been constantly on a diet for many years. She taught her young daughter that fat = bad and thin = good, and promoted a variety of odd and unproven “diets” in the household. When J was younger and had friends over, her mother would greet them at the door saying “I’m sorry you have to meet me when I’m so fat.” As she grew up, J developed the same body type as her mother and, as an adult, is the same size. As a result, J’s train of thought goes like this: mom says she’s fat; I look like mom; I’m fat; fat equals bad; I’m fat and bad.

So many people would like something to be different about their body shape or size, or their overall appearance. Maybe you would like to eat healthier or exercise more, maybe you want to lose or gain weight, or change your muscle tone, and/or maybe you have a poor body image that gets in the way or your self-esteem and happiness (and may or may not be related to the reality of your appearance). Depending on your personal situation, you may need to modify your nutrition, your fitness routine and/or your perspective about yourself.

Healthy eating needs to include both physical and emotional components. For your health and well-being, you need to eat mostly healthy most of the time. You should also have a fitness routine that works for you and your particular needs. Finally, you need to have an emotionally healthy and balanced relationship with food and exercise. Extreme perspectives and behaviors are rarely helpful in achieving overall wellness. Excessive emotional eating won’t help you reach your goals, but neither will excessive exercise or radical diet approaches. Sometimes, you need to let yourself enjoy your food and appreciate the social and cultural role it serves. For example, you are supposed to eat cake on your birthday (or whatever treat you prefer), and maybe not just one piece, and maybe for breakfast the next day too. So, don’t beat yourself up for occasionally straying from your plan. Balance is the key—nutritionally and emotionally.


Would you like something to be different about your weight, your nutrition, or how you see your body?

Over-eating? Restricting? Bingeing? Track you food behavior and figure out what’s going on.

Delaying the decision ~ a trick to taking back your power over food

Retrain your brain to see yourself more positively and more accurately

How bad is it? From minor insecurities to significant eating disorders ~ here’s what you need to do
   to take care of yourself.





BluebirdPages.com was created to provide accurate and useful information about a variety of personal and interpersonal topics. You can also find stories here about people whose life experiences may be similar to yours. BluebirdPages.com is not psychotherapy. Its goal is to provide information and ideas that can help you find your own power over your own life, and move toward greater happiness, comfort and fulfillment.
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